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Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

New York, NY
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Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center — the world’s oldest and largest private cancer center — has devoted more than 130 years to exceptional patient care, innovative research, and outstanding educational programs. Today, we are one of 45 National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, with state-of-the-art science flourishing side by side with clinical studies and treatment.

The close collaboration between our physicians and scientists is one of our unique strengths, enabling us to provide patients with the best care available as we work to discover more-effective strategies to prevent, control, and ultimately cure cancer in the future. Our education programs train future physicians and scientists, and the knowledge and experience they gain at Memorial Sloan Kettering has an impact on cancer treatment and biomedical research around the world.

www.mskcc.org

Meet the nurses from this location:

Kimberly Chow, RN, ANP-BC, ACHPN

Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner
Memorial Sloan Kettering
719
Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner
Memorial Sloan Kettering
Kimberly Chow, RN, ANP-BC, ACHPN
Kimberly works with cancer patients-- those newly diagnosed and those nearing the end of life-- to help palliate their symptoms, resolve emotional and familial issues, and urge them to have tough conversations about their end of life wishes. She has also tried to champion "quality of life" over "quantity" within her own family, and understands that these decisions are never easy.
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Ann Culkin, RN, OCN

Clinical Nurse
Ambulatory Care Thoracic Oncology Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering
706
Clinical Nurse
Ambulatory Care Thoracic Oncology Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering
Ann Culkin, RN, OCN
Ann works specifically with lung cancer patients at one of the premiere cancer research centers in New York City. She is proud of the many advancements science has made in prolonging the lives of those diagnosed with terminal illnesses, and even saw her own mother survive well beyond her prognosis. And yet, sometimes she knows that the search for "a cure" comes at too great a cost to families and patients.
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Dignity Family Pain Acceptance Choices Dignity Choices